Classical Civilisation FAST TRACK A Level

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Description

Classical Civilisation FAST TRACK A Level


NCC Home Learning are pleased to offer the opportunity to study to AS and A2 the Classical Civilisation A-level course as specified by OCR. The A-level has several aims:

To give a knowledge and understanding of the classical world through direct study of original sources
To encourage and develop an enthusiasm for the classical world
To develop an awareness of the relationship between the modern and the classical world, and the effect that
the latter has had on shaping and making the former
To give candidates the chance to form their own personal responses to the set texts chosen for study
To further and enhance their analytical and evaluative skills.

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Classical Civilisation FAST TRACK A Level


NCC Home Learning are pleased to offer the opportunity to study to AS and A2 the Classical Civilisation A-level course as specified by OCR. The A-level has several aims:

To give a knowledge and understanding of the classical world through direct study of original sources
To encourage and develop an enthusiasm for the classical world
To develop an awareness of the relationship between the modern and the classical world, and the effect that
the latter has had on shaping and making the former
To give candidates the chance to form their own personal responses to the set texts chosen for study
To further and enhance their analytical and evaluative skills.

Course Outline

Students are strongly recommended to familiarise themselves with the OCR specification for the A-level GCE in Classical Civilisation. The document can be downloaded as a pdf file, alongside further student support and assessment materials at:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/asa_levelgceforfirstteachingin2008/classics_civilisation/index.html

The OCR A-level in Classical Civilisation is divided into four units. These are:

AS Level
Unit 1: Homer’s Odyssey and Society (F382)

Homer’s epic poem the Odyssey and the values and societies it represents. The principal focus of the unit is on literature, with secondary focus on history and archaeology. The examination questions will be set on Odyssey Books 4-12 and 18-22.

The social and cultural context: The themes to be studied and on which candidates shall be examined are: the role of the gods and the power of fate; the stories of the heroes; the concept of heroism including timé and kleos; morality including justice and revenge; life and society as portrayed by Homer; the role of women; hospitality and xenia; the role of slaves and the historical and archaeological background.

The literary context: Furthermore, candidates are expected to demonstrate their knowledge of: the oral tradition; textual transmission of the texts; the preliterate form of the texts and theories of the composition of the text; structure of the text and literary techniques; the language of epic; characterisation; supernatural elements; realism and fantasy; disguise and recognition and nostos.

Unit 2: Greek Tragedy in its Context (F384)

The tragic plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides as literary works and as social documents for the societies and values they represent. The principal focus of this unit is on literature, society and values, with a secondary focus on philosophy, religion and history. From June 2009-2011 inclusive, the examination questions will be set on: Aeschylus’ Agamemnon; Sophocles’ Oedipus the King and Euripides’ Medea and Bacchae.

The social and cultural context: Candidates will be expected to demonstrate their knowledge and show understanding of the following in fifth century Athens: dramatic festivals; the role of the gods and fate; oracles, omens and prophecies; morality including justice and revenge; death and burial; the stories of the heroes and the ideas of honour and reputation; the role of men in the life of the city; the position of women in society and the importance of children and the family.

The literary context: Furthermore, candidates are expected to demonstrate their knowledge of: the theatre building and machinery; the use of actors; the use of the chorus; other dramatic conventions; attitude towards the portrayal of death and violence; characterisation; use of language and dramatic irony; the nature of tragedy including hamartia, katharsis and peripeteia and the particular styles and approaches characteristic of the three tragedians and their contribution to the development of the genre of Greek tragedy.

A Level
Unit 3: Art and Architecture in the Greek world (F388)

The sculpture, architecture and vase painting of the classical Greek world with a principal focus on art, architecture and religion. The secondary focus is on society and values. Candidates must be familiar with a range of free-standing sculpture, temple architecture, vase paintings and architectural sculpture.

Prescribed material: For further details of the prescribed artefacts of visual culture see the OCR specification p.54 onwards for details of this unit.

http://www.ocr.org.uk/Data/publications/key_documents/AS_ALevel_GCE_Classics_Specification.pdf

The artistic and cultural context: Candidates will be expected to show knowledge and understanding of: stylistic features and development of vases, architecture and sculpture; the evolution of different types of buildings; physical characteristics; architectural elements and the Doric and Ionic orders; composition; techniques; function of art and architecture and themes.

Unit 4: Virgil and the World of the Hero (F390)

Virgil’s epic poem the Aeneid and the values and societies it represents, with a principal focus on literature, society and values, and a secondary focus on religion, politics and history. The similarities and differences between Virgil’s portrayal of the hero and that found in selected parts of Homer’s Iliad.

The political, social, historical and cultural context: Candidates are expected to show their knowledge and understanding of: Virgil’s relationship to the regime of Augustus and the political and historical background in which the Aeneid was written.

The literary context: Furthermore, candidates are expected to show knowledge and understanding of: the composition of both epics; the plot; narrative and descriptive techniques; characterisation and themes including heroism, honour and reputation, family, women, the role of the gods, the power of fate, the portrayal of war, moral values and the role of Aeneas in imperial history of Rome.

Format of the Examinations

AS Units 1 and 2

Each unit is worth 50% of the total marks available for the AS GCE, and 25% for the A2 GCE if taken. The papers are each 90 minutes long and each carry 100 marks.

Unit 1: Homer’s Odyssey and Society

Section A: commentary question (45 marks). Candidates answer one question from a choice of two, each question having three sub sections.

Section B: essay question (55 marks). Candidates answer one question from a choice of three. Bullet point guidance is given for each of the essay questions.

Unit 2: Greek Tragedy in its context

Section A: commentary question (45 marks). Candidates answer one question from a choice of two, each question having three sub sections.

Section B: essay question (55 marks). Candidates answer one question from a choice of three. Bullet point guidance is given for each of the essay questions.

A2 Units 3 and 4

Each unit is worth 25% of the total marks available for the A2 GCE. The papers are each 2 hours and each carry 100 marks.

Unit 3: Art and Architecture in the Greek world

Section A: commentary question (50 marks). Candidates answer one question from a choice of two, each question having two sub sections.

Section B: essay question (50 marks). Candidates answer one question from a choice of two. This unit is synoptic.

Unit 4: Virgil and the world of the hero

Section A: commentary question (50 marks). Candidates answer one question from a choice of two, each question having two sub sections.

Section B: essay question (50 marks). Candidates answer one question from a choice of two. This unit is synoptic.

Textbooks

Homer Odyssey Translated by E V Rieu, revised translation by D C H Rieu (Penguin)

Aeschylus Agamemnon Translated by R F Fagles (Penguin)

Sophocles Oedipus the King Translated by R F Fagles (Penguin)

Euripides Medea Translated by P Vellacott (Penguin)

Euripides Bacchae Translated by J Davie (Penguin)

Virgil Aeneid Translated by D West (Penguin)

Homer Iliad Translated by M Hammond (Penguin)

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There are no frequently asked questions yet. Send an Email to info@springest.co.uk