BA English Literature and Drama

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BA English Literature and Drama

University of East Anglia
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Description

Drama at the University of East Anglia has been ranked 2nd in the Guardian University Guide 2012, leaving other prestigious theatre and drama schools in its shadow. This programme combines modules in English literature with practical drama modules, enabling you to study the relationships between the practices of writing in all major genres - prose, poetry and drama - and the practices of dramatic production and acting. There is also the opportunity for you to study on placement with professional companies. A final year module brings the two subjects together in a study of the concept of genre, and of the adaptation of literature for the stage.

The joint course in Literature and Drama divides…

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Drama at the University of East Anglia has been ranked 2nd in the Guardian University Guide 2012, leaving other prestigious theatre and drama schools in its shadow. This programme combines modules in English literature with practical drama modules, enabling you to study the relationships between the practices of writing in all major genres - prose, poetry and drama - and the practices of dramatic production and acting. There is also the opportunity for you to study on placement with professional companies. A final year module brings the two subjects together in a study of the concept of genre, and of the adaptation of literature for the stage.

The joint course in Literature and Drama divides your study between the two disciplines. The way in which you select modules means that you decide the precise balance between literature and drama in your course. You may, for example, choose to study a wide range of genres, including the novel and poetry, or gradually to specialise in dramatic literature. You will certainly have opportunities to study work from a wide range of periods, and to explore continuities between dramatic and literary theory. In your practical modules you will work alongside full-time drama students in the Studio which is highly adaptable for all stage and auditorium configurations and has full support facilities.

Course Structure Year 1

The first year is largely mapped out for you, to provide you with a good foundation for your studies in years 2 and 3. In the first semester you take Applied Drama and Technical Skills, along with the first year Drama students, and Reading Texts tutorials with the Literature students. Reading Texts is a small-group tutorial which encourages you to explore and reflect on your responses to literature. In the second semester you take Reading Texts II and Postwar British Drama. You will also choose whether to take a lecture module on Literature and History or one on World Dramatic Literature. You will also participate in an assessed production and learn how to use the Drama Studio facilities including lighting and sound.

Year 2

In your second year you have a wide choice of modules covering drama and literature from all periods, and creative writing, including scriptwriting. There is also the option to broaden your studies and take modules in American Drama and Shakespeare's England. You may (though this is entirely optional) decide to spend the first semester on placement at a theatre, drama school, or with a theatre, film or television company at home of abroad. Some students choose to take The Actor and the Text module which focuses on performance skills while others choose the Drama Outreach Project whereby Drama is taken out into the community (recent projects include working in schools, hospitals and with young people). There is a range of literature-based modules to choose from.

Year 3

In the final year you take a module which has been specially designed to combine your two subjects, dealing with the theory of genre and with the practicalities of adapting literary material for the stage. You choose between a personal project in which you perform, write and design, and the third year production of a full-scale play. This still leaves you with many optional units in literature, drama or dramatic literature. Further information can be found on the 'What will I study?' page.

Teaching and Assessment:

Key skills, issues and ideas are introduced in lectures given by all members of faculty, including literary critics, literary historians, writers and specialists in Drama. Further study is undertaken in small group seminars. These are chosen from a range offered within the School and across the University. You will also spend time studying and researching in the library or carrying out practical work or projects. For this course some modules are taught by practical workshop and can also be assessed by production. In most subject areas, you are assessed at the end of each year on the basis of coursework and, in some cases, project and examination results. In your final year, you will write a dissertation on a topic of your choice and with the advice of tutors. There is no final examination. Your final degree result is determined by the marks you receive in years two and three.


Course Organiser:Mr. Tony Gash
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Entry Requirements A Level: AAB including English Literature International Baccalaureate: 33 points overall with 5 in HL English Scottish Advanced Highers: AAB including English Literature Irish Leaving Certificate: AAAABB Access Course: Please contact the university for further information. HND: Please contact the university for further information. European Baccalaureate: 80% overall, with 80% in English Literature Entry Requirement

All applicants must have a minimum of grade B in A-Level English Literature (or the combined English Language & Literature) and must offer an additional Arts or Humanities subject at A-Level. Students studying the IB programme must offer a second Arts or Humanities subject at Higher Level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading). Recognised English Language qualifications include:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • TOEFL: Internet-based score of 88 overall (minimum 18 in the Listening and Writing components; 19 in the Reading component; and 21 in the Speaking component)
  • PTE: 62 overall with minimum 55 in all components

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the high level of academic and English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.

Interviews

We operate an initial shortlisting process for this course on the basis of the information an applicant provides on their UCAS form. Candidates who are shortlisted will be invited to interview and audition and offers are only made after a successful interview and audition. These take place on Visit Days and include an opportunity to look around the campus, view accommodation, meet current students, talk to staff members and find out more about the course. The interview and audition itself will be with one of our Drama tutors. Candidates are asked to perform a short monologue from a selection provided and there is also a discussion which generally covers topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We encourage you to apply if you have alternative qualifications equivalent to our stated entry requirement. Please contact our Admissions team for details.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have Mathematics and English at Grade C or above at GCSE Level.

Assessment

For the majority of candidates the most important factors in assessing the application will be past and future achievement in examinations, academic interest in the subject being applied for, personal interest and extra-curricular activities and the confidential reference. We consider applicants as individuals and accept students from a very wide range of educational backgrounds and spend time considering your application in order to reach an informed decision relating to your application. Typical offers are indicated above. Applicants to this course who are shortlisted will also be required to attend for interview and audition.

The School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing brings together writers, scholars, teachers and students in an exploration of the powers and possibilities of literature. Our aim is to make creative writing and critical reading confront one another in ways that sharpen and enliven both. We teach and research across the range of English Literature from the fourteenth century to the twenty-first. This coverage is supplemented by our interests in European Literature, in postcolonial writing in English across the world, and in literary and cultural theory.

Translation

UEA is home to the British Centre for Literary Translation, which is both a forum for professional translators and a focus for translation work with undergraduate and postgraduate students of literature. The School of Literature & Creative Writing runs the MA in Literary Translation course.

Creative Writing

For over thirty years UEA has been an important centre for established and upcoming writers, whether they come here as teachers, as students, as writers in residence, or to take part in the long-running literary festival organised by the Arthur Miller Centre and the Centre for Creative and Performing Arts.

Drama

Our drama programmes combine critical study with creative practice. The theoretical aspect draws on the expertise of LIT as a whole; the practical work is based in the purpose-built Drama Studio.

Literature

Literature at UEA is not a complete, finished object of study, but a living practice. Because we also do creative writing, translation and drama, we are aware that imaginative writing is not fixed; it is constantly being transformed, adapted, rewritten and reread. Students are invited to study these processes, and also to be part of them.

Among a diverse group of about twenty literature lecturers, there are experts on the various roles that the practice of literature can play, and has played, in society — how it can be something like praying, or like journalism, or like conversation, how it can be a form of political action, or a vehicle for ideas, or a working out of unmanageable experience, or a way of negotiating (or inflaming) differences of class and race and gender. We teach literature not in isolation, but in relation to this untidy bundle of social and psychological purposes.

It follows that we have no great respect for the boundaries that divide one academic discipline from another. We take a lively interest in the work of our colleagues in history, philosophy, film, the visual arts and music, and we encourage our students to do the same. That is why we offer a range of degree programmes which combine literature with other, related subjects. Our largest programme is the BA in English Literature: this is a single subject degree, but we work to keep it open and responsive to its multi-disciplinary surroundings.

UniStats Information Fees and Funding University Fees and Financial Support: UK/EU Students

Further information on fees and funding for 2012 can be found here

University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

The University will be charging International students £11,700.00 for all full time School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing undergraduate programmes which start in 2012.

Please click to access further information about fees and funding for International students


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