Instrumental or Vocal Teaching BMus (Hons)

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Description

There are three routes available for students who want to train as practical music teachers:

  • BMus (Hons) Instrumental Teaching (four years)
  • BMus (Hons) Vocal Teaching (four years)
  • BA (Hons) Music with Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (three years)

Instrumental Teaching and Vocal Teaching are important career options for performers and our four year BMus (Hons) Instrumental Teaching and BMus (Hons) Vocal Teaching are particularly designed to equip you for a career as a visiting teacher and in your own private practice, whilst at the same time developing your skills as a performer. You will learn how to practically prepare pupils for public performances and for graded examinations and school m…

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Didn't find what you were looking for? See also: BMus, Instrumental or Vocal Teaching, Teacher Training, Teaching Skills, and Music Theory.

There are three routes available for students who want to train as practical music teachers:

  • BMus (Hons) Instrumental Teaching (four years)
  • BMus (Hons) Vocal Teaching (four years)
  • BA (Hons) Music with Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (three years)

Instrumental Teaching and Vocal Teaching are important career options for performers and our four year BMus (Hons) Instrumental Teaching and BMus (Hons) Vocal Teaching are particularly designed to equip you for a career as a visiting teacher and in your own private practice, whilst at the same time developing your skills as a performer. You will learn how to practically prepare pupils for public performances and for graded examinations and school music assessments while developing an in-depth understanding of individual, group, and ensemble teaching skills. You will work as part of a vibrant community of musical performers, working in all musical styles, and undertaking work placements in local schools, with West Sussex Music Service or with UCMA (our own Junior Academy - please visit www.chi.ac.uk/ucma), have individual vocal or instrumental tuition, and join the choirs, orchestras and other ensembles at the university.

The three year BA (Hons) Music with Instrumental or Vocal Teaching is an alternative route which entails a broader academic musical training, whilst also keeping a focus on developing teaching skills. In year one you will study repertoire and technique for young learners, learn about preparing students for graded exams in year two and how to teach in groups in year three. Whichever route you take you’ll also develop important career skills like business planning, lesson planning, marketing yourself as a teacher, and being self-employed.

Some of the modules you might take…

Psychology of Learning and Teaching

This module explores psychology - the internal processes - involved from both the teacher and student perspective during musical learning. These lecture-based sessions involve exploration of the impact of physical learning demands on the young musician’s body and of effectively meeting this challenge through age appropriate strategies. The understanding of motivation, self-efficacy, self-regulation, mental skills, and cognitive strategies are explored and then applied to real-life situations through roleplay and peer teaching scenarios.

Technique for the Young Performer

Appropriate technical advice is especially important for beginners, particularly the young player or singer whose physical development – rather like a young tennis player’s – can be adversely affected by poor information in the early stages of learning. While musicians can expect to teach a few adult learners as part of their work, the majority of their future pupils will be children.

Grades and Development

This module is designed to make connexions between the measured progress of the young player or singer and the general musical development of the child. Sessions are focused on graded development at early stages, with particular attention being paid to the acquisition of aural training and sightreading skills. During the course consideration is given to general aspects of repertoire and skill development and students are encouraged to focus at least part of their study on an elected specialist area. The concept of a musical curriculum is explored. With grade VIII acceptable as an A level for university entrance purposes, this process is as academically important to the young player as other work they undertake at school or college.

Preparing Young Musicians for Assessment

The placement experience will include a focus on the ‘new’ instrument that the student learns during this term. Aural tests, scales, and sight reading will be included in a broad exploration of the examination syllabus and the pressures or constraints that the exam places on the preparation process. This enables students to truly recreate the feelings experienced by beginner students and will reflect on how this informs and shapes their teaching approaches. Students will have the chance to observe school children in the early stages of learning a new instrument, will reflect on how the observations relate to their personal experience during the module, and on how the preparation for an exam fits in to the broader context of musical learning.

Repertoire for the Young Performer

To provide students with an understanding of appropriate repertoire for young players and singers, the established graduated repertoire of the Associated Board, TrinityGuildhall, and Rockschool examination syllabi are examined. In order to understand and begin to create a well-rounded curriculum for a student learning your specialist instrument or voice, ways in which a range of adapted or purpose-created musics can usefully become part of the repertoire of the beginner are developed.

Approaches to Teaching

Students will engage in workshop activity designed to explore the potential of strategies and material in various teaching contexts and will be encouraged to reflect on the relationship between this activity and their practical, placement experience. Students will be placed with a student from within the university setting, possibly from another department (for example a history student), and will deliver six 30-minute lessons as a private teacher. External placements will be with a musical group/class/ensemble at a school or a music centre and students will both observe the methods, manner, and style of that teacher and will choose and adapt a piece for that group. The culminating experience of the module will be to have their chosen piece played by the school children in a teaching situation. In preparing for this, the students will create a ‘mock’ situation with a varied ensemble made of their peers, gaining hands on experience in having to gauge a musical level and manage a group.

Entry Requirements

01243 816002 or www.chi.ac.uk/department-music

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