BA English and American Literature

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Description

The writers of Britain and America are of course deeply connected: often they employ the same language, address the same readers, share the same cultural reference points. But at the same time, the two traditions differ sharply in their typical values and tones of voice. This programme allows you to experience these continuities and distinctions. Students on this programme have access to the courses that make up the degrees in English Literature and American and English Literature. The combination also means that you encounter the teaching of two different Schools: the interdisciplinary work of the School of American Studies, and the more literary focus of the School of Literature, Drama an…

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Didn't find what you were looking for? See also: American Literature, Literature, English (FCE / CAE / CPE), Poetry, and C/C++.

The writers of Britain and America are of course deeply connected: often they employ the same language, address the same readers, share the same cultural reference points. But at the same time, the two traditions differ sharply in their typical values and tones of voice. This programme allows you to experience these continuities and distinctions. Students on this programme have access to the courses that make up the degrees in English Literature and American and English Literature. The combination also means that you encounter the teaching of two different Schools: the interdisciplinary work of the School of American Studies, and the more literary focus of the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing.

Your degree course will be planned in conjunction with your adviser, but we give an outline here. The basic unit of teaching, the module, lasts for one semester and carries twenty credits in Years 1 and 2, thirty credits in Year 3. The academic year contains two semesters; in each semester you will normally take three units, making a total of six units a year (two and four respectively in the final Year). Over the three years of your course you will normally accumulate 360 credits: that is, eighteen modules. Free choice modules are available – either to extend your degree subjects, or to venture outside them. As we believe in encouraging interdisciplinarity, you will be required to take three units (sixty credits) outside English and American Literature. Within our own Faculty of Arts and Humanities, this could involve taking units in American Studies, Creative Writing, Drama, History or Film, for example. Alternatively, you may opt for units offered by the Faculty of Science or the Faculty of Social Sciences subject to entry requirements.

Course Structure: Year 1

The first year requires you to take introductory courses in both traditions, though a slight emphasis is placed on the less familiar American literature and on its social and historical background. Courses such as Imagining America, and Literature in History provide you with the context within which future studies will unfold. You will have a list of optional modules to choose from, encouraging you to broaden your awareness of related subjects such as film, drama, philosophy, linguistics or history.

Year 2 and Year 3

The precise mixture of English and American modules in the second and third years is up to you, and you will discuss your choices with your faculty adviser to make sure that you end up with a balanced programme. You are required to take a number of modules outside the immediate English and American Literature programme. There is a wide range of modules to choose from in the Faculty of Humanities, including free-choice courses in drama, film and creative writing as well as offerings in other literatures and in history.

You can also (and subject to entry requirements) use your free choices to take modules offered by other faculties.

Modules of study are taught in a number of different forms – often lectures and smaller seminar groups – designed to encourage student participation. In every module your work is assessed; forms of assessment also vary, including essays, project work, presentation, examination or a combination of any of these methods. You may also write a dissertation during your final year.

This programme does not include a year in the USA.

Teaching and Assessment:

Key skills, issues and ideas are introduced in lectures given by all members of faculty, including literary critics, literary historians, and writers. More specialist study is undertaken in small group seminars. These are chosen from a range offered within the School and across the University. You will also spend time studying and researching in the library or carrying out practical work or projects. In most subject areas, you are assessed at the end of each year on the basis of coursework and, in some cases, project and examination results. In your final year, you will write a dissertation on a topic of your choice and with the advice of tutors. There is no final examination. Your final degree result is determined by the marks you receive in years two and three.


Course Organiser:Prof Peter Womack
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Entry Requirements A Level: AAB-ABB including English Literature grade A International Baccalaureate: 33-32 points overall with score of 6 in HL English Scottish Advanced Highers: AAB-ABB including English Literature grade A Irish Leaving Certificate: Please contact the university for further information. Access Course: Please contact the university for further information. HND: Please contact the university for further information. European Baccalaureate: 80-75% overall, including 80% in English Literature Entry Requirement

The combined English Language and Literature A-level is acceptable instead of English Literature. A second Arts or Humanities subject at A-Level is usually preferred. Students studying the IB programme should also offer a second Arts or Humanities subject at Higher Level.

Students for whom English is a Foreign language

We welcome applications from students from all academic backgrounds. We require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading). Recognised English Language qualifications include:

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall (minimum 6.0 in all components)
  • TOEFL: Internet-based score of 88 overall (minimum 18 in the Listening and Writing components; 19 in the Reading component; and 21 in the Speaking component)
  • PTE: 62 overall with minimum 55 in all components

If you do not meet the University's entry requirements, our INTO Language Learning Centre offers a range of university preparation courses to help you develop the high level of academic and English skills necessary for successful undergraduate study.

Interviews

The majority of candidates will not be called for an interview. However, for some students an interview will be requested. These are normally quite informal and generally cover topics such as your current studies, reasons for choosing the course and your personal interests and extra-curricular activities.

Gap Year

We welcome applications from students who have already taken or intend to take a gap year, believing that a year between school and university can be of substantial benefit. You are advised to indicate your reason for wishing to defer entry and may wish to contact the appropriate Admissions Office directly to discuss this further.

Special Entry Requirements

English Literature A-Level grade A is required.

Intakes

The School's annual intake is in September of each year.

Alternative Qualifications

We encourage you to apply if you have alternative qualifications equivalent to our stated entry requirement. Please contact our Admissions team for details.

GCSE Offer

Students are required to have Mathematics and English at Grade C or above at GCSE Level.

Assessment

For the majority of candidates the most important factors in assessing the application will be past and future achievement in examinations, academic interest in the subject being applied for, personal interest and extra-curricular activities and the confidential reference. We consider applicants as individuals and accept students from a very wide range of educational backgrounds and spend time considering your application in order to reach an informed decision relating to your application. Typical offers are indicated above. Please note, there may be additional subject entry requirements specific to individual degree courses.

The School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing brings together writers, scholars, teachers and students in an exploration of the powers and possibilities of literature. Our aim is to make creative writing and critical reading confront one another in ways that sharpen and enliven both. We teach and research across the range of English Literature from the fourteenth century to the twenty-first. This coverage is supplemented by our interests in European Literature, in postcolonial writing in English across the world, and in literary and cultural theory.

Translation

UEA is home to the British Centre for Literary Translation, which is both a forum for professional translators and a focus for translation work with undergraduate and postgraduate students of literature. The School of Literature & Creative Writing runs the MA in Literary Translation course.

Creative Writing

For over thirty years UEA has been an important centre for established and upcoming writers, whether they come here as teachers, as students, as writers in residence, or to take part in the long-running literary festival organised by the Arthur Miller Centre and the Centre for Creative and Performing Arts.

Drama

Our drama programmes combine critical study with creative practice. The theoretical aspect draws on the expertise of LIT as a whole; the practical work is based in the purpose-built Drama Studio.

Literature

Literature at UEA is not a complete, finished object of study, but a living practice. Because we also do creative writing, translation and drama, we are aware that imaginative writing is not fixed; it is constantly being transformed, adapted, rewritten and reread. Students are invited to study these processes, and also to be part of them.

Among a diverse group of about twenty literature lecturers, there are experts on the various roles that the practice of literature can play, and has played, in society — how it can be something like praying, or like journalism, or like conversation, how it can be a form of political action, or a vehicle for ideas, or a working out of unmanageable experience, or a way of negotiating (or inflaming) differences of class and race and gender. We teach literature not in isolation, but in relation to this untidy bundle of social and psychological purposes.

It follows that we have no great respect for the boundaries that divide one academic discipline from another. We take a lively interest in the work of our colleagues in history, philosophy, film, the visual arts and music, and we encourage our students to do the same. That is why we offer a range of degree programmes which combine literature with other, related subjects. Our largest programme is the BA in English Literature: this is a single subject degree, but we work to keep it open and responsive to its multi-disciplinary surroundings.

UniStats Information Fees and Funding University Fees and Financial Support: UK/EU Students

Further information on fees and funding for 2012 can be found here

University Fees and Financial Support: International Students

The University will be charging International students £11,700.00 for all full time School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing undergraduate programmes which start in 2012.

Please click to access further information about fees and funding for International students


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