Neuropsychology BPS306

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Description

Learn about nervous system control and behaviour. This course provides a different perspective on psychology; with insights into how many psychological disorders can be more to do with the physical condition of a person than purely their experiences, attitudes, genetics or learning experiences. It is a fascinating study for anyone interested in either psychology or human biology; and a useful course for anyone working in areas related to health or psychology.

Pre-requisites: A basic understanding of human biology is desirable, though not essential.

Course Structure There are ten lessons in this module as follows:
  1. Foundations of Neuropsychology
  2. Neurophysiology
  3. Neuroanatomy
  4. Laterality and …

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Didn't find what you were looking for? See also: Animal Psychology, Psychology, EC-Council, Emotional Intelligence, and Interpersonal Skills.

Learn about nervous system control and behaviour. This course provides a different perspective on psychology; with insights into how many psychological disorders can be more to do with the physical condition of a person than purely their experiences, attitudes, genetics or learning experiences. It is a fascinating study for anyone interested in either psychology or human biology; and a useful course for anyone working in areas related to health or psychology.

Pre-requisites: A basic understanding of human biology is desirable, though not essential.

Course Structure There are ten lessons in this module as follows:
  1. Foundations of Neuropsychology
  2. Neurophysiology
  3. Neuroanatomy
  4. Laterality and Callosal Syndromes
  5. Cognition, personality and emotion
  6. Perception Disorders
  7. Motor Disorders
  8. Language
  9. Dementia
  10. Neurodevelopment
AIMS
  • To describe the relevance of neuropsychology to managing psychological disorders.
  • To explain the physiology of the nervous system.
  • To describe the anatomy of the nervous system.
  • To describe how conditions within the brain affect the way in which a person is physically capable or incapable of performing a variety of different tasks.
  • To explain how various aspects of a person\'s thought processes may vary according to that person\'s neurobiology.
  • To describe a variety of perceptual disorders.
  • To explain a variety of motor disorders.
  • To explain the neuropsychology of language.
  • To differentiate between different dementias.
  • To explain aspects of development in neuropsychological terms.
EXAMPLES OF WHAT YOU MAY DO IN THIS COURSE
  • Learn about the development of Neuropsychology and techniques used in human neuropsychological studies;
  • Describe the Neuroanatomy of:
    • Brainstem
    • Cerebellum and cerebral cortex
    • Organisation of the cerebral cortex
    • Cranial nerves , brain covering, ventricular system, arteries
    • Brain malfunction
    • Visual system
    • Other systems;
  • Determine why there is laterality;
  • Discuss callosal syndrome;
  • Discuss and compare theories of frontal lobe function;
  • Contrast normal aspects and abnormal aspects of emotion from a neuropsychological perspective;
  • Develop a diagnostic table of perceptual disorders;
  • Determine how the brain perceives faces;
  • Discuss language formation;
  • Describe language disorders;
  • Develop a table of kind of dementia;
  • Learn how recovery of function is affected across age spans.

Extract from Course Notes:

The nervous system allows humans to adapt to changes. Changes can occur inside (e.g. too little oxygen while running) or outside (e.g. the anticipation of food or the chill of a winter wind). The nervous system will perceive the change and will take actions to adjust to it. The nervous system is rather like the look-out on a river boat - it monitors conditions and gives warnings when something unusual or dangerous is ahead. Once the warning is received, the body is able to take steps to avoid or correct the situation. The nervous system has to be highly complex to be able to perform such sophisticated services.

Until the late 1800\'s, scientists did not know if the nervous system was made up vast networks of connected nerve cells, or whether the cells were separate. We now know that they are, and that they carry out their enormous task of keeping the body alive and functioning, and our minds working, by means of chains of action. The human brain is estimated to have around 100 billion nerve cells working to help create apparently seamless and integrated action, thought, and body function. To understand how they interact, we must learn about their individual structure and behaviours.

NEURONS

The nervous system contains two kinds of cells: neurons, which receive and transmit messages, and glia, which help maintain neurons and facilitate their functioning.

The cell body or soma is the place in the neuron where major metabolic activity occurs, as it does in all animal cells. The soma of a neuron is enclosed in a plasma membrane that separates the cell from its environment. Water, oxygen and carbon dioxide can move through the membrane, and certain ions (atoms with a positive or negative charge), such as calcium, potassium, and sodium, can pass through the membrane in special channels.

The membrane also encloses a fluid called cytoplasm, within whichfloat all the structures essential to the proper functioning of the cell. These structures, called organelles, have specific functions, and include:

  • a nucleus (lacking in red blood cells), which contains chromatin (active DNA) and a nucleolus (formed from chromatin) that produces ribosomes;
  • ribosomes, where the cell builds the protein it needs;
  • mitochondria, where energy is produced for all the cell\'s activities;
  • endoplasmic reticulum, a network of tubes that moves proteins to different parts of the cell;
  • lysosomes, which recycle cell material and repair the plasma membrane; and
  • the Golgi complex, a network of sacs that stores hormones for secretion by the cell.

A Second Extract From the Course -

Endorphins

Endorphins are neurotransmitters that are similar to the chemical morphine. They have the effect of reducing pain. Endorphin\'s become more active in the body during extreme exercise (eg. long distance running). Narcotic drugs have an affect similar to endorphins (in effect duplicating the affect of an endorphin, but they are not natural; and may have side effects that endorphin\'s do not have). It is thought by some that acupuncture works through its affect upon releasing endorphin\'s throughout the body. Research has shown that acupuncture does work to reduce pain for a significant proportion of people tested; but not all.

How is a person\'s psychology is affected by anatomical and physiological characteristics of their nervous system?

The nervous system allows humans to adapt to changes. Changes can occur inside (e.g. too little oxygen while running) or outside (e.g. the anticipation of food or the chill of a winter wind). The nervous system will perceive the change and will take actions to adjust to it. The nervous system is rather like the look-out on a river boat - it monitors conditions and gives warnings when something unusual or dangerous is ahead. Once the warning is received, the body is able to take steps to avoid or correct the situation. The nervous system has to be highly complex to be able to perform such sophisticated services.

Until the late 1800\'s, scientists did not know if the nervous system was made up vast networks of connected nerve cells, or whether the cells were separate. We now know that they are, and that they carry out their enormous task of keeping the body alive and functioning, and our minds working, by means of chains of action. The human brain is estimated to have around 100 billion nerve cells working to help create apparently seamless and integrated action, thought, and body function. To understand how they interact, we must learn about their individual structure and behaviours.

This course provides a different perspective on psychology; with insights into how many psychological disorders can be more to do with the physical condition of a person than purely their experiences, attitudes, genetics or learning experiences.

It is a fascinating study for anyone interested in either psychology or human biology; and a useful course for anyone working in areas related to health or psychology.

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    There are no frequently asked questions yet. Send an Email to info@springest.co.uk