Beef Cattle BAG206

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Description

Keen to develop your skills in the management , economics and marketing of beef cattle? Develop your abilities to analyse and make decisions about the management requirements of beef cattle. This comprehensive introduction covers cattle breeds and breeding, diseases, feeding and nutrition. You will also develop your skills in management (including feed lot and stud herd management), economics and marketing.

Comment from one of our Beef Cattle students: I find that I can apply my knowledge directly on the property. All assignments are relative to real life C. Rowland Jones

Course Structure

This course is divided into 10 lessons, as follows:

  1. Introduction to Beef Production and Beef Cattle Br…

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Didn't find what you were looking for? See also: Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, Economics, International Economics, and BSc.

Keen to develop your skills in the management , economics and marketing of beef cattle? Develop your abilities to analyse and make decisions about the management requirements of beef cattle. This comprehensive introduction covers cattle breeds and breeding, diseases, feeding and nutrition. You will also develop your skills in management (including feed lot and stud herd management), economics and marketing.

Comment from one of our Beef Cattle students: I find that I can apply my knowledge directly on the property. All assignments are relative to real life C. Rowland Jones

Course Structure

This course is divided into 10 lessons, as follows:

  1. Introduction to Beef Production and Beef Cattle Breeds
  2. Beef Cattle Production Systems
  3. Beef Cattle Breeding
  4. Diseases in Beef Cattle (Viral and Bacterial)
  5. Diseases in Beef Cattle (Parasites, etc.)
  6. Nutrition for Beef Cattle
  7. Commercial Herd Management
  8. Feed Lot Management
  9. Stud Herd Management
  10. Management, Economics and Marketing

What you will do in this course

Visit a range of enterprises which may include farms, agricultural shows, and suppliers of farm products in order to research, photograph, describe and specify facilities in the places visited as a basis, or part basis, of assignment questions;

  • Identify beef cuts on a labelled diagram of a steer\'s body;
  • Judge a beef animal according to commonly recognised commercial standards;
  • Choose two breeds suitable for beef production in specified climates;
  • Observe and report on common cattle husbandry tasks, including dehorning, castration, dipping, vaccination, and drenching;
  • Explain methods that are used to control beef cattle movements;
  • Prepare a production schedule or timetable of husbandry practices for a typical beef cattle property in your locality for a period of 12 months;
  • Attempt to determine the nature and scope of beef cattle breeding in your state or country;
  • Explain the differences between and advantages of pure breeding and cross breeding;
  • Describe and explain management and other factors that can affect calving percentage and calf weaning;
  • Visit a supplier of health care treatments for cattle to determine what products (eg. dips, medicines etc) are available;
  • Describe a significant viral disease, including its identification, symptoms and control;
  • Interview someone working in the industry to determine the significance and nature of disease problems in beef cattle;
  • List parasites and related organisms that are significant to beef cattle in your region;
  • Report on the preferred food requirements for beef cattle on a beef property you have visited;
  • Explain common health problems affecting animals, including the circumstances under which animals contract health problems, and methods used to prevent the development of ill health.
  • Analyse physical indicator symptoms of ill health in animals.
  • Explain the diagnostic characteristics of the main types of animal pathogenic microorganisms.
  • Explain the methods used in the treatment of pests and diseases in farm animals.
  • Explain the role of inflammation, including it\'s symptoms and causes, in animals.
  • Determine the taxonomic class of animal pests and diseases.
  • Explain the biological processes which affect and control the immune system in animals.
  • Explain the biological processes which affect and control tissue repair in animals.
  • Determine procedures for the management of wounds to animals, on a farm.
  • Explain the processes involved in cellular change in animals.
  • Diagnose simple health problems in farm animals.
  • Develop guidelines for assessing general signs of ill health in beef cattle. These guidelines should consider diseases and nutritional factors;
  • List minimum equipment required to run a commercial beef cattle property. Equipment will include suitable machinery and tools;
  • In table form (or chart), distinguish between bulls, heifers and calves;
  • Describe three diseases affecting feedlot cattle;
  • List criteria for selecting cattle for a feedlot and state what characteristics of the cattle should be considered;
  • In table format with two columns, compare the management of beef cattle in feedlot with the management in a paddock;
  • Explain in 500 words the management of a stud beef herd on a property you visited;
  • Explain in 200 words the legal requirements and regulations concerning beef cattle;
  • Distinguish the following terms of grades of beef: prime, choice, good, standard, utility.

Extract: Sample of Notes from this course

Beef cattle form a useful and necessary role in agricultural production for the following reasons:

(a) Beef provides protein and some minerals and vitamins which are necessary to human health and which balance other nutrients that are obtained from plant foods. Animal protein (meat) contains amino acids which are essential to the growth and development of humans. In general, children cannot grow properly without the protein obtained from meat, milk and eggs. Vegetarians can be healthy on a meat-free diet provided they are extremely careful about their diets.

(b) Beef is always in demand to satisfy human appetites. People like the taste of beef and as the standard of living and incomes rise throughout the world, the demand for animal products also rises. Developed countries eat the most meat per person while the underdeveloped countries eat the least.

(c) Cattle are ruminants that convert non-human foods into protein. Beef cattle convert grass and roughage (which can\'t be eaten by humans) into high quality human food.

(d) Ruminants use native pastures and by-products from arable crops such as straw. These products are available on farms but have little resale value. They are converted into saleable products by processing them through the ruminant animal.

(e) Beef cattle produce manure which feeds the soil and maintains soil structure. This increases the production of the arable crops on the farm.

(f) Beef cattle can make use of marginal land. Although the greatest demand is for the high energy plant foods such as cereals and oil seeds, the amount of useable land in the world is limited. Marginal land which is unsuitable for high value cropping can used efficiently used for beef production.

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    There are no frequently asked questions yet. Send an Email to info@springest.co.uk